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Posts tagged Feminism

19,657 notes &

“The bottom line is that saying there are differences in male and female brains is just not true. There is pretty compelling evidence that any differences are tiny and are the result of environment not biology,” said Prof Rippon.

“You can’t pick up a brain and say ‘that’s a girls brain, or that’s a boys brain’ in the same way you can with the skeleton. They look the same.”

Prof Rippon points to earlier studies that showed the brains of London black cab drivers physically changed after they had acquired The Knowledge – an encyclopaedic recall of the capital’s streets.

She believes differences in male and female brains are due to similar cultural stimuli. A women’s brain may therefore become ‘wired’ for multi-tasking simply because society expects that of her and so she uses that part of her brain more often. The brain adapts in the same way as a muscle gets larger with extra use.

“What often isn’t picked up on is how plastic and permeable the brain is. It is changing throughout out lifetime.

“The world is full of stereotypical attitudes and unconscious bias. It is full of the drip, drip, drip of the gendered environment.”

Prof Rippon believes that gender differences appear early in western societies and are based on traditional stereotypes of how boys and girls should behave and which toys they should play with.

Men and Women Do Not Have Different Brains, Claims Neuroscientist (via thegendercritic)

Thumbs up.

I’ve always found it so weird how people confuse “biological” with “hard-coded”. They tend to think that if you detect a difference between two brains, or a statistically significant difference between male and female brains, then that must mean those people are hard-coded to be different. In other words, they seem to conceive brain activity as a cause for thoughts rather than thoughts themselves. Claiming that women are better at multitasking because the brain areas associated with multitasking flare up more often is pretty much the definition of a tautology. It doesn’t actually say anything about the origin of those differences, if there are any differences at all.

This reminds me of an event with Simon Baron-Cohen that I attended soon after moving to Cambridge. The dude’s so dishonest. It’s infuriating. (via rairun)

(via exercisesinhumiliation)

Filed under quoted for truth feminism science

11 notes &

ladybusinessplus:

Jodie and Ana Co-Review Parks and Recreation (S1 - S5)
Jodie: “Parks and Recreation” quickly became my happy place show. If I was feeling down, or cynical I would marathon it because I knew it would restore my faith in the world. So, can we start by talking about what makes this program so full of hope and wonder?
Ana: Yes, that’s a great place to start! You’ll be unsurprised to hear I feel much the same way about it as you: I first got into “Parks and Rec” in January and February of 2013, and it made for perfect comfort watching during my least favourite months of the year. I think one the the things that make it a happy place series for people like us is the fact that, to once again borrow an analogy I know I’ll be using forever, “Parks and Recreation” is a hilarious series that doesn’t feel the need to punch us in the face all that much. All too often sitcoms default to the assumption that it’s hilarious to reinforce dominant sexist, racist, heteronormative, etc assumptions, often in a really gross wink-wink-aren’t-we-edgy-for-challenging-the-PC-thought-police sort of way. But “Parks and Rec” shows that being hilarious and being offensive really don’t go hand in hand. The humour is seldom lazy or mean-spirited, and I’d like to see anyone try to argue that it suffers for it. I do think there are some exceptions to its positive portrayal of women (and other disempowered groups), which I’ll be happy to discuss later on, but overall? There are awesome ladies all over this show. [READ MORE — READ A LOT MORE — WE’RE SERIOUS IT’S PRETTY LONG]

ladybusinessplus:

Jodie and Ana Co-Review Parks and Recreation (S1 - S5)

Jodie: “Parks and Recreation” quickly became my happy place show. If I was feeling down, or cynical I would marathon it because I knew it would restore my faith in the world. So, can we start by talking about what makes this program so full of hope and wonder?

Ana: Yes, that’s a great place to start! You’ll be unsurprised to hear I feel much the same way about it as you: I first got into “Parks and Rec” in January and February of 2013, and it made for perfect comfort watching during my least favourite months of the year. I think one the the things that make it a happy place series for people like us is the fact that, to once again borrow an analogy I know I’ll be using forever, “Parks and Recreation” is a hilarious series that doesn’t feel the need to punch us in the face all that much. All too often sitcoms default to the assumption that it’s hilarious to reinforce dominant sexist, racist, heteronormative, etc assumptions, often in a really gross wink-wink-aren’t-we-edgy-for-challenging-the-PC-thought-police sort of way. But “Parks and Rec” shows that being hilarious and being offensive really don’t go hand in hand. The humour is seldom lazy or mean-spirited, and I’d like to see anyone try to argue that it suffers for it. I do think there are some exceptions to its positive portrayal of women (and other disempowered groups), which I’ll be happy to discuss later on, but overall? There are awesome ladies all over this show. [READ MORE — READ A LOT MORE — WE’RE SERIOUS IT’S PRETTY LONG]

Filed under TV Parks and Recreation Feminism Leslie Knope Awesome Ladies

34,410 notes &

fishingboatproceeds:

nprfreshair:

Beyoncé's super secret album just dropped this morning, causing quite a stir.In one of the songs, “Flawless” she samples Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's TEDx talk on feminism. In the song she says:

We teach girls to shrink themselves, to make themselves smaller

We say to girls – you can have ambition, but not too much

You should aim to be successful but not too successful otherwise you will threaten the man

Because I am female I am expected to aspire to marriage

I am expected to make my life choices always keeping in mind that marriage is the most important

A marriage can be a source of joy and love and mutual support

But why do we teach girls to aspire to marriage and we don’t teach boys the same?

We raise girls to see each other as competitors not for jobs or for accomplishments,

Which I think can be a good thing

But for the attention of men

We teach girls that they cannot be sexual beings in the way that boys are

Feminist: A person who believes in the economic, social and political equality of the sexes.

If you haven’t yet, check out Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s interview on Fresh Air for her newest book Americanah. The book also made the NPR best list for 2013.

Americanah was also named one of the ten best books of the year by the New York Times Book Review. I just bought it!

<3 IT’S SO GOOD.

Filed under Feminism Reading Writers

7 notes &

I’m excited that Eleanor Catton won the Booker

She seems like a cool lady and The Luminaries sounds just like the sort of sprawling 19th century set novel that I love to lose myself into. However, the media hyperfocus on her age, exemplified by articles like this, kind of annoys the hell out of me. Emphasising her youth to such an extent can be a form of backhanded condescension: a 28-year-old woman is an adult, not some sort of cutesy prodigious child, and I don’t believe her age makes the win more praise-worthy than if she had been 36 or 52.

Why do we privilege cultural narratives that fetichize youth and add to the pressure to be bigger, better and brighter than anyone else before you reach 30, or else you’re doomed to mediocrity until the end of times and nothing you ever do could possibly amount to anything? Can I remind the world of last week’s commentary about Alice Munro, who first became a published author at 37?

Life is not over until it’s over. I know the pressures and demands of adulthood are complicated, but we do ourselves a disfavour if we slip into believing that if we haven’ achieved x by age y then it’s unequivocally Too Late. “All great people achieve things when they’re young” is nothing but a harmful myth.

Filed under Books Reading Feminism

7 notes &

knopperbrister asked: I *think*, but I might very well be wrong, that you watch(ed) Borgen? DR have had a lot of success lately, with that and Forbrytelsen and Broen, all of which have had a female main character. NRK interviewed the leader of the drama department in DR and she said they are, quote "tired of strong women" unquote and that the writers are "begging" to get to write about men. She says he think male leads will be a trend in Denmark starting now. I just, I mean, GRR, I need a someone to rant with me.

Yep, big Borgen fan here. I just… have no words :| It reminds me of the time someone said girl protagonists were “an overdone trope” in YA. It just goes to show the extent to which stories about boys and men are perceived as the default. Tell a bunch of those and it’s business as usual, but have more than 10% stories about women and it’s OH NOES WHEN WILL THIS TIRESOME TREND END.

Filed under questions and comments TV Feminism

6 notes &

What I did at work today. Totally worth going in with only 4 hours of sleep. Just before my shift ended someone checked out Woman and Reclaiming the F-Word and it was really satisfying :D

What I did at work today. Totally worth going in with only 4 hours of sleep. Just before my shift ended someone checked out Woman and Reclaiming the F-Word and it was really satisfying :D

Filed under Feminism Libraries

31 notes &

But with me they have the backing of all other posers of the [why fantasy] question, from my mother-in-law on: females shouldn’t really be doing this. This is particularly noticeable when, as quite often happens, one of my books is reviewed alongside a book by a male writer. He, being a man, is assumed to have powerful motives for writing fantasy for young people (for who otherwise would?) and the delicacy and power with which he conveys his message is most seriously gone into. The felicities of his language are remarked on and praised. Then the reviewer passes on to me: Jones always does this sort of thing – it’s in her chromosomes, she can’t help it – take no notice – but really, as a woman, she should stop being clever. My brain hurts.
I think the hidden but constant assumption that, as a woman, I can’t help writing for children because it is a by-product of my natural function as a mother, and therefore as meaningless as a lullaby or a nonsense-rhyme, is the one I probably resent most.
Actually my Pig of the Year Award went to the male reviewer of Fire and Hemlock. I quote it here in full: ‘This is a girls’ book and I don’t see why I should try to understand it.’ End review.

!

I desperately want to think that a review this overtly sexist and dismissive wouldn’t be published today, but I’m really not sure. And even if so, these days we ignore women’s writing instead, which isn’t exactly better.

From Diana Wynne Jones’ Reflections on the Magic of Writing - full review.

Filed under Children's Literature DWJ Diana Wynne Jones Gender Reflections Sexism YA Feminism

2 notes &

Anonymous asked: I have this otherwise very nice friend who is very much a gender essentialist. She claims there are "fundamental differences" between men and women, cites studies like the one with the infants, denies and denies again and again that there are such things as genders other than male and female and keeps defending her view just by saying the word "biology." I would llike very much to convince her, and wondered if you had any ideas on how to do so?

I suppose locking her in a room with a copy of Delusions of Gender and throwing away the key isn’t an option? :P

Seriously though, I know how frustrating those conversations can be :\ Sometimes there’s just no getting through to people, especially when they simply shut you down. What I’ve found helpful (to varying degrees) is to focus on the science itself as much as possible. People like to shout “science! biology!” in a way that implies that whatever objections we have to essentialism *must* be political. But while it’s true that I don’t particularly like the political implications of gender essentialism, the main reason why I reject it isn’t that. The main reason is that it’s simply not supported by the facts as we known them.

You could try pointing out that infant studies such a Baron-Cohen’s have huge methodological flaws (tiny samples, not being double-blind) and explain why these things matter; that the results haven’t been successfully replicated; that there are contradictory findings; that many gender-related generalisations are actually based on anecdotal evidence; and that when it comes to neuroscience and gender even the biggest experts are pretty much still fumbling in the dark, because even when differences are found we still don’t know enough to draw reliable conclusions about what they mean. Brain plasticity is also worth bringing up. It’s a mistake to assume that any differences in the brain are innate and not the result of the genders being socialised differently,  because learning is not fairy dust: it’s literally written into our brains and it affects who we become.

If she brings up politics at any point, you could try saying that while it’s true that questioning the status quo is a political position, the same goes for trying to uphold it. It therefore makes no sense to suggest that only people doing the former could be affected by biases. Unfortunately we tend to see culturally dominant ideas as “neutral”, but that’s far from the truth.

Good luck! As I said, I haven’t always been successful in getting through to people myself, and I appreciate how difficult these conversations are. One of the reasons why I never tire  of reading books on this topic is that they help me improve my arguments and give me lots of examples that I can use.

Filed under Questions and Comments Feminism

74 notes &

Fheyheyrenay:

malindalo:

“Gender Balance in YA Award Winners Since 2000” at Lady Business — A fascinating look into the stats behind YA awards by gender of protagonists and authors, addressing the common belief that boys don’t read YA because there are too many girls in it.

I watched this project form and am super proud of Ana for accomplishing it. Although trying to figure out some of those protagonists on Google Books was not the most fun I’ve had in ages. So of course, that means…ANA, LET’S ADD 2012’S DATA NEXT YEAR. :D :D

Consider it done ;)

Fheyheyrenay:

malindalo:

“Gender Balance in YA Award Winners Since 2000” at Lady Business — A fascinating look into the stats behind YA awards by gender of protagonists and authors, addressing the common belief that boys don’t read YA because there are too many girls in it.

I watched this project form and am super proud of Ana for accomplishing it. Although trying to figure out some of those protagonists on Google Books was not the most fun I’ve had in ages. So of course, that means…ANA, LET’S ADD 2012’S DATA NEXT YEAR. :D :D

Consider it done ;)

Filed under Feminism Books Reading

69 notes &

Gender Balance in YA Award Winners since 2000
As you can probably tell by the sneak peek above, the results paint a picture that might be surprising if we take the conventional wisdom about the current gender ratio in YA into account. One of the key things about these results is the fact that they raise two possibilities: the first is that the gender balance in award winners is proportional to the gender balance in YA at large, in which case we should perhaps pause and consider the cultural biases that make us see female dominance where none exists; the second is that the gender balance in award winners is completely out of synch with the rest of YA, and in that case we’re left with questions about why we’re rewarding stories by and about men so disproportionately. 

Gender Balance in YA Award Winners since 2000

As you can probably tell by the sneak peek above, the results paint a picture that might be surprising if we take the conventional wisdom about the current gender ratio in YA into account. One of the key things about these results is the fact that they raise two possibilities: the first is that the gender balance in award winners is proportional to the gender balance in YA at large, in which case we should perhaps pause and consider the cultural biases that make us see female dominance where none exists; the second is that the gender balance in award winners is completely out of synch with the rest of YA, and in that case we’re left with questions about why we’re rewarding stories by and about men so disproportionately. 

Filed under Books Feminism Reading

8 notes &

thevirgilinthegarden asked: Not being too intelligent nor a very perceptive feminist, I'm hoping for your opinion to something that's being worrying me. It's about a post by Pat Rothfuss titled 'Concerning Hobbits, Love, and Movie Adaptations'. I read his latest post (Oct 1) replying to fanmail and thought back to the post in the link. I can't decide if it's sexist; it seems vaguely problematic, but I cant tell if it actually is. His attitude about it seems flippant? But that doesn't necessarily imply sexism, does it?

First of all, I read the post you mentioned and yeah, the high school crush/porn star analogy made me incredibly uncomfortable, mostly because it’s male gazey in the extreme. Rothfuss assumes that his readers will be heterosexual men who’ll be able to follow the analogy, and he underestimates how alienating and even vaguely threatening reading something like that can be for a woman.

For the record, I am pro-porn: not all feminists are in agreement when it comes to this, but personally I don’t think porn is inherently anti-feminist. But when I think of mainstream porn, it’s hard to dissociate my feelings from the fact that in actuality much of it is extremely misogynist.The porn scenario Rothfuss describes makes me uncomfortable not because I want to shame women for their sexuality, but because sentences like “she’s wearing fuck-me red lipstick and a lot of dark eye makeup. Her breasts are amazing now, proud and perfectly round” evoke a kind of porn where it’s only the men who set the terms. So reading something like this is yet another reminder that for much of the world, my subjectivity doesn’t matter because I’m a woman; that many, many men perceive me as an object to be stared at and whose sexuality only exists in relation to their desires.

As for the second part of your question, I guess it all depends on how you define “sexist”. Reading Rothfuss’ last post I can see he’s willing to engage with feminism, and I really value that. But that doesn’t mean he won’t also do or say problematic things sometimes, as all of us do. Personally I find it useful to label specific actions or behaviours as sexist rather than people. I realise that this has the potential to be read as me going out of my way to spare the feelings of dudes who barely even acknowledge that *I* have feelings, but to me it’s less about their feelings and more about picking useful strategies to enact change. A lot of people still don’t understand that being told “this thing you just did/said is pretty sexist” is NOT the same as being told “you’re a completely worthless human being and there’s nothing you can do to ever change that”. They become defensive; they stop listening instead of taking the time to think of why that one thing they did is not okay and how they can avoid doing it again in the future. We’ve all been raised in a patriarchy, so all of us (including feminist women like me) have done/said/thought sexist things at one point or another. I find it useful to think of sexism as a pattern of thoughts and behaviours we *all* need to make a conscious effort not to slip into rather than as an unforgivable personal flaw, so I try to make things as impersonal as possible when addressing something I find problematic. Obviously I’m not suggesting this is the one true feminist strategy - I’m glad there are people out there adopting different strategies towards the same goal, because we need as much diversity of voices and approaches as possible. Some people will respond well to my kind of mild-mannered diplomacy; others actually need someone to shout at them a bit before they listen.

Also, I know I don’t know you, but your question was perceptive and I have no reasons whatsoever to believe you’re not intelligent. I second-guess myself a lot, and to this day I struggle with feeling that I’m not smart/articulate/knowledgeable enough to have opinions on this or that feminist issue. It’s helpful to have people you can bounce ideas off or approach for a second opinion, but over the years I’ve also learned to trust my instincts and to listen to my voice. If a situation makes me uncomfortable, there’s probably something there, and even if others don’t agree it doesn’t mean my response isn’t valid.

I really hope this helps.

Filed under Questions and Comments Feminism

86 notes &

I hate this increasing insistence that boys and girls are alien species, coming together only to do icky romance dances of ickiness, and make more boys and girls to never understand each other at all. Girls can like snakes. Boys can like looking nice for dates. And that doesn’t mean a damn thing but “we are all individuals, we will all like and want and do different stuff.”

At least we’re all allowed to know how to fight zombies.

seanan_mcguire: Surviving snakebite, in the desert, in space, and…sudden stardom? What? / Love this. Read the whole post. (via gwendabond)

(via gwendabond)

Filed under Feminism quotes

26 notes &

I&#8217;m sorry, I just can&#8217;t help but find this the coolest thing ever. It&#8217;s a 1908 postcard satirising the Sufragette movement, but from my privileged present-day position I can&#8217;t help but read it as, &#8220;Votes for women: lolcat approved&#8221;. Not what the satirists intended, but I like my reading better :D

I’m sorry, I just can’t help but find this the coolest thing ever. It’s a 1908 postcard satirising the Sufragette movement, but from my privileged present-day position I can’t help but read it as, “Votes for women: lolcat approved”. Not what the satirists intended, but I like my reading better :D

Filed under Cats Feminism